//Russian polar bear spray-painted with T-34 sparks outrage from wildlife specialists

Russian polar bear spray-painted with T-34 sparks outrage from wildlife specialists

Video of an unlucky polar bear in Russia spray-painted with “T-34,” the identify of a well-known World War II Russian tank, has sparked outrage from wildlife specialists.

The video was posted to Facebook by Sergey Kavry, who works on the World Wildlife Fund, in keeping with his bio on the social community.

Within the translated publish, Kavry wrote that with the spray-painted marking on his aspect the polar bear can have a tougher time discovering prey. “He won’t be able to hunt unnoticed.”

MORE THAN 50 POLAR BEARS INVADE RUSSIAN VILLAGE, SPARKING GOVERNMENT TO DECLARE STATE OF EMERGENCY

In a subsequent remark, Kavry defined the video got here from a WhatsApp group utilized by indigenous minority individuals within the Chukotka area in Russia’s far east. Nonetheless, he doesn’t have any info on the place the footage was captured.

The footage of the painted bear sparked outrage on Fb, in addition to dialogue about how somebody may immobilize after which spray-paint a polar bear.

Kavry added that if “T-34” does certainly discuss with the enduring World Conflict II tank, then it’s “some kind of perverted disrespect to history.”

EMACIATED POLAR BEAR SPOTTED IN RUSSIAN CITY, FAR FROM USUAL HABITAT

The BBC reports that Russian media has speculated that the spray-painted bear could also be linked to native anger over the animals getting into communities in Arctic Russia. An investigation has been launched to search out out the place the footage was captured, it reported.

Polar bear - file photo.

Polar bear – file photograph.
(iStock)

Earlier this 12 months greater than 50 polar bears invaded a distant settlement within the Novaya Zemlya archipelago, prompting the federal government to declare a state of emergency.

Environmentalists have warned that climate change and receding Arctic ice is forcing wild animals out of their conventional searching grounds. Polar bears are described as “vulnerable” by the World Wildlife Fund.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox Information’ Christopher Carbone contributed to this text. Observe James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers